KJ Basics!

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KJ Basics!

Post  MrLawMoose on Tue Nov 27, 2012 3:14 pm

IFS=Independent Front Suspension

SAS= Solid Axle Swap

LOST Tech Info = http://www.kjjeep.com/custom2.html

Rock Crawler Review: http://www.rockcrawler.com/reviews/jeep/liberty_2002/index.asp

Specs: http://www.southpointjeep.com/liberty/specs/feature6.html

In April '02 the KJ springs were lowered 3/4".

Engines:

2.4L I4

2.8L I4 Turbo CRD (Common Rail Diesel) available in '05

3.7L V6 (pictured below) Source: http://www.rockcrawler.com

Transmissions:

NV1500, 5spd comes with the 2.4L

NV3550, 5spd comes with the 3.7L Sport model

45RFE, 4 spd auto 3.7L in '02

42RLE, 4spd (same as '03+ TJs) in '03

NSG 370, 6spd available in 2005

Tcase:

NV231 Command Trac/Part-time

NV242 Selec Trac/Full-time

Front Axle:

D30, IFS

Source: http://www.rockcrawler.com


Rear Axle:

Chrysler 8.25, 29 spline

Source: http://www.rockcrawler.com

Lockers Available for the 8.25: ARB (selectable), Detriot, and Powertrax No SlipLimited Slip Options for the 8.25: Auburn Gear LSD, Trac-Lok LSD


Available Gear Ratios:

3.55

3.73

4.10

*Optional 4 wheel disc brakes for all models

KJ Lift guide
IFS: independent front suspensionUCA: upper control arm LCA: lower control armUBJ: upper ball jointLBJ: lower ball jointCV’s: constant velocity joints SFA: solid front axle OTT: over the top / so on top of the strut / spacer lift

CRD: common rail diesel / the KJ diesel OME: old man emu JBA: jeepin by alALL J: All J productsRLF: rock lizard fabrications

What is the best lift for my Libby? ( no matter if it’s 4 or 2 wheel drive )

The Liberty is built on a unibody structure, not a body on frame like other jeeps. Because of this, body lifts are not possible.

GASOLINE:

Jeepinbyal

Frankenlift

OME /Rancho lift

Daystar 2.5” spacer lift

CRD:

CRD Frankenlift

OME lift

CRDSTU lift


What are they?

Jeepinbyal: 2,5”- 4” or 6” lift needed? Skyjacker shocks / JBA springs http://www.jeepinbyal.com

Frankenlift: OME heavy duty coils, rancho or ome shocks, added spacer and top plate for even more lift. Preassembled front struts. Seehttp://www.boulderbars.com for all the ins and outs.

OME coils+Rancho shocks: just like it says, you get the OME 927 / Rancho RSX 17505 up front and the OME 948/ Rancho RSX 17004 on the rear.

Daystar 2,5¨ lift: A so called spacer lift, meaning you fit spacers under your stock springs.

CRD:

CRD Frankenlift : OME kit with preassembled front struts

OME lift: front OME 927 or 790 coils* - NS131 shocks / OME 948 - N132 or **N132L (+2,5”) / Rancho RSX 17004 shocks for the rear.

*: for the 2.8CRD must use 790 only**: the N132L can only be bought at ALLJ or RLF.

CRDSTU lift: Australian guy who has custom designed super heavy duty King Springs and even longer OME rear shocks. You can reach him at angstu@bigpond.net.au Remember: he’s in Australia so shipping can be very pricy.

Can I install any of these myself?

Yes you can. But for some you will have to take the front struts apart.

See this 'how to' for a 2.5" Daystar install made by KJ TAZ:

http://www.lostjeeps.com/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=26190&start=0

How much lift will I get?

Most common on any of these is 2,5” to 4” lift. Except for the JBA 6”.

What is the difference between a 926 and a 927 OME coil?

Spring Rates:

925 Light Load: 350 lbs926 Medium Load: 375 lbs927 Heavy Load / CRD Medium: 400 lbs790 CRD Heavy Load: 500 lbs

Just for comparison:Stock/Rustys: 310 lbs

Which OME Springs Should I Fit?

If your vehicle is stock and you simply want a taller stance, fit the medium-rate springs for your particular vehicle in both front and rear. The medium springs will give you a taller stance and will also give your vehicle improved handling on the road. You will also be able to carry medium loads without sagging your springs. If your vehicle is fitted with a heavy-duty front bumper like the ARB Winch Bar or the TJM Bull Bar, even without a winch, recommended are heavy-duty front springs. The heavy-duties are required to prevent your front end from sagging even if you do not have a winch fitted. If you do have a winch fitted in addition to your heavy-duty front bumper, then it's highly recommended to fit heavy-duty front springs on the ground that the medium-duty front springs will sag.

For the rear, if you are going offroading, you should be carrying all of the necessary recovery equipment required for offroading, spare parts, food, Power Tank, Engel Freezer Fridge, fuel and water containers, spare clothing, etc. All of this equipment weighs a considerable amount. Accordingly, it's generally recommend to fit heavy-duty for the rear.

Do I need bump stops and why?

Yes you need longer bump stops. A common rule of thumb is for every inch of lift an inch of bump stop is needed. You can use the Terraflex (3") or the Daystar’s on the front.

For the rear there are Daystar’s but any DIY will do, hockey pucks and rubber mallets are most commonly used.

Why you need them: If you fit longer springs they can be compressed to far with the stock bump stops so you get spring binding (the metal parts of the coil touching). That’s not good. The spring will start to sag or even break pretty quick.

OME has now stated that for their suspension system you do not need any longer bumpstops. Beware: that works only if you do not mix their stuff with other components!

Can I fit the Daystar 2,5” spacer to a OME lift?

No you cannot. Anything above 4” needs more modifications, see how JBA does it.

Why can’t I fit a gasser frankenlift to a CRD?

Mainly because of engine weight and cv joints will go ‘kaboom’ after a short while.

How do I level after a lift / what if it starts to sag?

For the front you can fit extra top plate spacers these go on top of the strut (Rusty) or the spring (JBA) or do a clevis lift

On the rear you can add extra isolators (the rubber doughnuts on top of spring=rear isolator part # 52088707AA) You can add a total of 2 to each spring max.

What is a clevis lift?

Jack up your Libby, get a stand under it, take of the wheel, loosen up the clevis bolt. Get a crowbar and gently pry the clevis down. You can do a safe 3/8 - 10mm lift. Re-torque the bolt. Done.

AFTERMARKET SHOCKS ONLY: If you want to make sure they don't sag back you can fit some conduit nuts under the strut.

What are conduit nuts?

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=75927-15527-47106&lpage=none

2 Pack 2" Rigid Conduit Locknut

Item #: 75927 Model: 47106

Steel

$1.38 for a two pack

Do I need an alignment after fitting the lift?

Yes you do. And a headlight adjustment.

Can I expect any problems getting alignment back to specs?

Not on a 2,5"/4" lift of this list. Maybe with other brands.

What are JBA uca's?

JBA uca's are aftermarket uca's that give the ubj a better angle when lifted thus also bringing alignment back into specs. They also prevent UBJ / strut contact. The ubj is greasable and much stronger then the mopar one.

Do I need JBA uca's?

That depends on the height of the lift and if you have UBJ to spring contact. On most lifts you don't but it's a great upgrade.

What tire size can I fit with brand/height X lift?

A 245/75/16 will fit under a 2,5" lift with very little to no rubbing. For more info on tire sizes please look here.http://www.lostjeeps.com/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=958

Any brake hose issues?

Yes on the '06/'07's you need to lengthen the rear brake hose bracket.

http://www.lostjeeps.com/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=45640

Sway Bars

Sway bars are on the front and rear of the KJ and they keep the vehicle from experiencing body roll in turns and off camber situations. The front should not be removed unless only temporarily while off roading. It is debatable whether disconnecting the front sway bar on an IFS vehicle is an advantage off road. The rear sway bar, however can be taken of if you desire more rear articulation. Almost all people that have taken the rear sway bar off feel that it provides better rear articulation while at the same time not affecting, in any noticeable way, body roll or additional vehicle movement in turns.

What's the "rub" on Fenders?

Depending on what tire size you choose along with what lift you choose, fender trimming may be required. The pinch weld is the most common ender adjustment needed to fit larger tires after a lift. The pinch weld is in the front wheel well and is a piece of plastic about 6" long and 1" wide that covers a piece of metal that needs to be move so you can run bigger tires. You will need to cut back the plastic, not off, and expose the metal. Take a large hammer and smash it flat to one side. Use a heat gun to melt the plastic piece back in place and you are done. Some people just cut the plastic covering off and call it done that way. From there, it depends a great deal on an individual basis to cover what you may or may not need to trim on your bumper or wheel well.
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MrLawMoose
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